Scary Spider

An exploration of the spectacular universe
through science, art, history, spirituality, and more

Why Do People 'Twitch' When Falling Asleep?

I have been told many times that it is easy to tell when I am falling asleep because I begin to twitch. I’m sure I have a twitchy follower or two that will enjoy this!

“I wonderwhose arms would I run and fall intoif I were drunk in a room with everyoneI have ever loved”
-Unknown author (please message me if you know the source!)
The Rape of Persephone was created by Gian Lorenzo Bernini in 1621, at which time he was only 23 years old.

“I wonder
whose arms would I run and fall into
if I were drunk 
in a room with everyone
I have ever loved”

-Unknown author (please message me if you know the source!)

The Rape of Persephone was created by Gian Lorenzo Bernini in 1621, at which time he was only 23 years old.

scienceyoucanlove:

Project Noah Fun Fact: 
We find thisNorthern ghost bat (Diclidurus albus) just too adorable to resist! Found in South America, Trinidad, and Central America, it is a relatively rare bat that eats insects. Once again, the scientific name gives us a clue to this creature. Diclidurus is the genus name and albus means white.spotted in Provincia de Manabí, Ecuador by PN member SergeiKoultchitskii:
http://www.projectnoah.org/spottings/5900777
source 

scienceyoucanlove:

Project Noah Fun Fact:

We find thisNorthern ghost bat (Diclidurus albus) just too adorable to resist! Found in South America, Trinidad, and Central America, it is a relatively rare bat that eats insects. Once again, the scientific name gives us a clue to this creature. Diclidurus is the genus name and albus means white.

spotted in Provincia de Manabí, Ecuador by PN member SergeiKoultchitskii:

http://www.projectnoah.org/spottings/5900777

source 

(via rhamphotheca)

markscherz:

biomorphosis:

Harvest mice are Europe’s smallest rodents. It is easily identified with its blunt nose, short, rounded hairy ears and golden-brown fur. It posses a remarkable prehensile tail, which is used as a fifth limb that aids climbing through the tall, dense vegetation of their meadow, hedgerow and crop field homes.
 

We have a harvest mouse in one of our offices and I basically die every time I see it.

markscherz:

biomorphosis:

Harvest mice are Europe’s smallest rodents. It is easily identified with its blunt nose, short, rounded hairy ears and golden-brown fur. It posses a remarkable prehensile tail, which is used as a fifth limb that aids climbing through the tall, dense vegetation of their meadow, hedgerow and crop field homes.

 

We have a harvest mouse in one of our offices and I basically die every time I see it.

(via shychemist)

One must still have chaos in oneself to be able to give birth to a dancing star.

Friedrich Nietzsche

biomedicalephemera:

softlysexy:

biomedicalephemera:

The relation between the pelvis and the pelvic organs of the female
With so many sex ed textbooks and encyclopedias giving the standard “vertical cross section” view of the pelvis, or showing the organs without any context, it can be difficult to see in the mind exactly where everything lays.
In this diagram, "P" indicates the part of the sacrum that is both at its top, and farthest “forward” in the body. Below that point, it curves backwards. "S" is the pubic symphysis, which is the joint that brings together the two sides of the pelvis. It’s largely immobile, but very slightly stretchable with trauma or childbirth. "F" is the fundus of the uterus - a fundus is the part of a hollow organ that is farthest from its opening. "O" is the ovary, embraced (but not touched) by the fallopian tubes."R" is the rectum, the lowest section of the intestine, which travels behind the reproductive organs."B" is the bladder, which lays in front of the reproductive organs.
There are two primary parts to the pelvis: the pelvic spine, which includes the sacrum and coccyx; and the pelvic girdle, which is probably what you associate with “pelvis” - this is the two “pelvic bones”, the hip bones or coxal bones. 
As children, we have six hip bones - three on each side. The ilium (the big “wing” part, where the abdominal muscles attach), the pubis (that upper part of the “eyes” in the pelvis), and the ischium (the lower bit of the “eyes”, the “sit bone”). By age 25, all three sections have fused together, leaving us with just two hip bones.
An American Text-Book of Obstetrics for Practitioners and Students. Edited by Richard C. Norris, 1895.

random fact: the uterus and the fallopian tubes look nothing like this “rendition” at all, the fallopian tubes are long and thinner than angel hair pasta, and the uterus is also quite tiny.

True! However, the uterus in this rendition is WAY smaller than the vast majority of contemporary illustrations. It’s much closer to what a non-pregnant woman would look like than most illustrators put.
But yeah, the ovaries are surprisingly far-yet-not-far from the fallopian tubes, which are tiny little things with spindly little fingers at the end. In living women, standing up, the uterus is usually not even visible from the front, if they’re not pregnant. The size increase of the uterus from implantation to parturition is amazing and almost terrifying (okay, at least to me). However, the fallopian tubes remain basically the same throughout the entire life, unless they’re “tied” or removed.

biomedicalephemera:

softlysexy:

biomedicalephemera:

The relation between the pelvis and the pelvic organs of the female

With so many sex ed textbooks and encyclopedias giving the standard “vertical cross section” view of the pelvis, or showing the organs without any context, it can be difficult to see in the mind exactly where everything lays.

In this diagram, "P" indicates the part of the sacrum that is both at its top, and farthest “forward” in the body. Below that point, it curves backwards.
"S" is the pubic symphysis, which is the joint that brings together the two sides of the pelvis. It’s largely immobile, but very slightly stretchable with trauma or childbirth.
"F" is the fundus of the uterus - a fundus is the part of a hollow organ that is farthest from its opening.
"O" is the ovary, embraced (but not touched) by the fallopian tubes.
"R" is the rectum, the lowest section of the intestine, which travels behind the reproductive organs.
"B" is the bladder, which lays in front of the reproductive organs.

There are two primary parts to the pelvis: the pelvic spine, which includes the sacrum and coccyx; and the pelvic girdle, which is probably what you associate with “pelvis” - this is the two “pelvic bones”, the hip bones or coxal bones.

As children, we have six hip bones - three on each side. The ilium (the big “wing” part, where the abdominal muscles attach), the pubis (that upper part of the “eyes” in the pelvis), and the ischium (the lower bit of the “eyes”, the “sit bone”). By age 25, all three sections have fused together, leaving us with just two hip bones.

An American Text-Book of Obstetrics for Practitioners and Students. Edited by Richard C. Norris, 1895.

random fact: the uterus and the fallopian tubes look nothing like this “rendition” at all, the fallopian tubes are long and thinner than angel hair pasta, and the uterus is also quite tiny.

True! However, the uterus in this rendition is WAY smaller than the vast majority of contemporary illustrations. It’s much closer to what a non-pregnant woman would look like than most illustrators put.

But yeah, the ovaries are surprisingly far-yet-not-far from the fallopian tubes, which are tiny little things with spindly little fingers at the end. In living women, standing up, the uterus is usually not even visible from the front, if they’re not pregnant. The size increase of the uterus from implantation to parturition is amazing and almost terrifying (okay, at least to me). However, the fallopian tubes remain basically the same throughout the entire life, unless they’re “tied” or removed.

(via innerpolymathy)

explorationimages:

NASA Prepares to Eye Comet’s Flyby of Mars

During an October 9 press briefing at NASA headquarters, panelists discussed the Earth and space-based assets that will be in position to observe the October 19 flyby of Mars by comet C/2013 A1, also known as comet Siding Spring. These assets include NASA’s iconic Hubble Space Telescope and spacecraft orbiting and roving Mars.

During the once-in-a-lifetime flyby, Siding Spring will pass within about 88,000 miles (139,500 kilometers) of the Red Planet — less than half the distance between Earth and our moon and less than one-tenth the distance of any known comet flyby of Earth. This proximity will provide an unprecedented opportunity for researchers to gather data on both the comet and its effect on the Martian atmosphere.

(via kaiyves)

mindblowingscience:

Saturn’s Wobbly Moon Hints at a Secret Sea

Saturn has a good number of exciting moons circling it. Titan by far its most famous, boasting a mysterious sea of methane, and Enceladus is characterized by its baffling geysers of water vapor and ice particles. However, we may now be adding Mimas to that list of intriguing moons. A new study has revealed that the dull-looking moon is literally shaking with a mystery of its own.
Mimas hasn’t gotten a lot of attention in the past, even as NASA’s Cassini has been whizzing around Saturn for more than 10 years.
"We thought it was the most boring satellite," Radwan Tajeddine, a planetary scientist at Cornell University, even recently admitted to Science Magazine.
However, a closer look at the moon recently revealed that Mimas has a rotational wobble far larger than expected.
"In physical terms, the back-and-forth wobble should produce about three kilometers of surface displacement," he explained in a statement. “Instead we observed an unexpected six kilometers of surface displacement.”
Tajeddine argues in a study recently published in the journalScience that something incredibly interesting has to be going on beneath the tiny moon’s geologically boring surface; and the only way to find out what’s there is to closely watch the wobble.
"Nature is essentially allowing us to do the same thing that a child does when she shakes a wrapped gift in hopes of figuring out what’s hidden inside," Tajeddine said.
According to a resulting study using 3-D computer models and Cassini spacecraft data, the scientist and his colleagues determined that Mimas’ interior is not uniform. They concluded that these pronounced wobbles could only be produced if the moon contains a weirdly shaped, rocky core or if a sub-surface ocean exists beneath its “dull” shell.
Tajeddine told the American Association for the Advancement of Science that he personally favors the latter of the two theories, as the gravitational tug of Saturn on Mimas’ eccentric orbit could produce enough tidal heating to maintain a liquid interior.
That would also put Mimas in the exclusive club of sea-bearing moons that Saturn’s Enceladus and Titan, and Jupiter’s moons Europa, Ganymede, and Callisto are already in. And that’s pretty cool.

mindblowingscience:

Saturn’s Wobbly Moon Hints at a Secret Sea

Saturn has a good number of exciting moons circling it. Titan by far its most famous, boasting a mysterious sea of methane, and Enceladus is characterized by its baffling geysers of water vapor and ice particles. However, we may now be adding Mimas to that list of intriguing moons. A new study has revealed that the dull-looking moon is literally shaking with a mystery of its own.

Mimas hasn’t gotten a lot of attention in the past, even as NASA’s Cassini has been whizzing around Saturn for more than 10 years.

"We thought it was the most boring satellite," Radwan Tajeddine, a planetary scientist at Cornell University, even recently admitted to Science Magazine.

However, a closer look at the moon recently revealed that Mimas has a rotational wobble far larger than expected.

"In physical terms, the back-and-forth wobble should produce about three kilometers of surface displacement," he explained in a statement. “Instead we observed an unexpected six kilometers of surface displacement.”

Tajeddine argues in a study recently published in the journalScience that something incredibly interesting has to be going on beneath the tiny moon’s geologically boring surface; and the only way to find out what’s there is to closely watch the wobble.

"Nature is essentially allowing us to do the same thing that a child does when she shakes a wrapped gift in hopes of figuring out what’s hidden inside," Tajeddine said.

According to a resulting study using 3-D computer models and Cassini spacecraft data, the scientist and his colleagues determined that Mimas’ interior is not uniform. They concluded that these pronounced wobbles could only be produced if the moon contains a weirdly shaped, rocky core or if a sub-surface ocean exists beneath its “dull” shell.

Tajeddine told the American Association for the Advancement of Science that he personally favors the latter of the two theories, as the gravitational tug of Saturn on Mimas’ eccentric orbit could produce enough tidal heating to maintain a liquid interior.

That would also put Mimas in the exclusive club of sea-bearing moons that Saturn’s Enceladus and Titan, and Jupiter’s moons Europa, Ganymede, and Callisto are already in. And that’s pretty cool.